The Way of the Artist

There is a saying that "Great art comes only from great suffering". I have my own opinions about that, but recently I saw an instance of the same happening  in real life. 

Last Saturday DH, our kindergartener and I were out shopping for groceries. We also needed a replacement bulb for our living room light fixture and had taken an old bulb as sample. On our way back, I casually glanced at our son on the back seat. It seemed the kiddo had grown very fat cheeks all of a sudden and there was a black screw bottom poking out of his mouth. I let out a gasp and pulled the bulb out of his mouth. Fortunately it was still in one piece.

DH was not about to let it go at that. He suddenly swerved on to the road's shoulder, slammed the brakes and took several partially successful swipes at the backseat occupant while I let loose a diatribe on the consequences of putting a bulb in one's mouth. Needless to say, my lecture was drowned in the frantic shrieks and scarpering to get away from his father's hand.  On the whole, we were greatly thankful that he was unharmed.

Later that evening we were all engrossed in our weekend activities when the kiddo came up to us with his Magna Doodle and showed us his sketch:


His explanation: "This is me when Acha comes to pinch me..."

Bears a close resemblance to this, hein? I assure you that our kid has never seen this painting ever before this. Makes you think what horrors little Munch must have gone through???


See how true art is created? Here is our own little Edvard Munch with his life experience sublimated to high art:


Kochi Biennale, look out, here is your future contributor!

And yes, after we were spent from our guffaws, I did take our almost-5-year-old aside and explain with great calm and emphasis about the consequences of trying to illuminate one's insides with anything other than an endoscope. Yep, that's sorted out now.

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